How StratoStar Watched The Eclipse

Eclipse

15 Sep How StratoStar Watched The Eclipse

Almost an entire month has passed since the eclipse happened, but the team at StratoStar is still on cloud nine. We loved sending two high altitude weather balloons to the edge of space during the event. Students from 25 different schools prepared experiments for the launch and have since had the opportunity to analyze what happened during the flight. One of the most spectacular aspects of these launches was seeing the total eclipse from the ground and the air.

Eclipse Flight Stats

The weather balloons we launched on the day of the eclipse traveled over 100,000 feet in the air. We timed the launch perfectly with the eclipse and were able to capture some amazing photos and videos from the edge of space. When the balloons finally came back down to the ground, our recovery team found them in the Shawnee Forest about 12 miles away from the launch site.

See more data from our flight.

Ready to see some of the incredible photos we captured before, during, and after the flight? Check them out below:

Experiments waiting to go into the payloads. Preparing for the eclipse.

Shot of the eclipse captured during the flight. When the balloon burst, you could see the eclipse perfectly.

How cool would it be to launch a weather balloon with your class? StratoStar works with educators all over the country to design curriculum and launch high altitude weather balloons. As part of a larger STEM initiative, weather balloons are an incredibly effective learning tool for students of all ages. Want to learn more? Our team would love to connect with you. Contact StratoStar today!

Jason Krueger
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Jason Krueger

Founder / President at StratoStar
Jason Krueger
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